Anaesthesia for Emergency Caesarean Section

  • G. Capogna
  • D. Celleno
  • R. Parpaglioni
Conference paper


The main problem with emergency caesarean section is the rapid induction of anaesthesia in a potentially unstable and unknown patient.


Spinal Anaesthesia Epidural Catheter Labor Analgesia Heart Rate Monitoring Uterine Blood Flow 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Capogna
    • 1
  • D. Celleno
    • 1
  • R. Parpaglioni
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of AnaesthesiaFatebenefratelli HospitalRomeItaly

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