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Diseases of the Liver

  • E. J. Rummeny
Conference paper
Part of the Syllabus book series (SYLLABUS)

Abstract

Liver imaging is one of the most important issues in abdominal radiology. This chapter describes typical imaging findings of focal and diffuse liver diseases using different imaging modalities such as ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and scintigraphy in selected cases.

Keywords

Spiral Compute Tomography Focal Nodular Hyperplasia Cavernous Hemangioma Focal Liver Lesion Dynamic Compute Tomography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. J. Rummeny
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Clinical RadiologyWesfalian Wilhelms-UniversityMünsterGermany

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