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Use of AEDs by Lay People in Patients with Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: How Does It Impact Survival?

  • A. Capucci
  • D. Aschieri
Conference paper

Abstract

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) claims an estimated 50 000 lives per year in Italy, representing a major public health problem. More people die each day of potentially reversible ventricular fibrillation (VF) than of any other cause of death, reversible or not. We know that restoring normal heart rhythm by a defibrillation shock not only saves life but is often followed by many years of active living. Unfortunately, most cardiac arrest does not occur in supervised places, and in more typical community settings victims of SCA rarely survive. Only 2%–5% of victims of SCA can be resuscitated with the commonly used emergency system of ambulances. The problem could be resolved simply by making defibrillation available to lay persons [1].

Keywords

Cardiac Arrest Emergency Medical Service Average Response Time Sudden Cardiac Arrest Automate External Defibrillator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Capucci
    • 1
  • D. Aschieri
    • 1
  1. 1.Cardiology Department“Guglielmo da Saliceto” General HospitalPiacenzaItaly

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