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What Is the Best Practical Scheme for Initiating Oral Anticoagulant Treatment in Outpatients with Atrial Fibrillation?

  • R. Cazzin
  • P. Serra
  • C. Fusilli
Conference paper

Abstract

Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have an approximately four-fold increased risk of stroke and systemic embolism [1]. Generally thrombus forms in the left atrial appendage because of the relative inactivity of the atria during AF [2]. The risk of stroke exists in all patients with AF, but the incidence of stroke is related to coexistent cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, or previous stroke [3,4]. Advancing age is associated with increased stroke risk, probably due to the effect of left atrium enlargement and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, frequently observed in elderly patients [5, 6], Nearly half of AF- associated strokes occur in patients older than 75 years.

Keywords

Atrial Fibrillation International Normalize Ratio Stroke Prevention Systemic Embolism Left Atrial Appendage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Cazzin
    • 1
  • P. Serra
    • 1
  • C. Fusilli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of CardiologyHospital of PortogruaroPortogruaro, VeniceItaly

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