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Pulmonary Infections in the Intensive Care Unit

  • A. Luzzani
  • E. Polati
  • S. Bassanini

Abstract

Pulmonary infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) include two different entities: firstly, patients admitted with pneumonia, which may be either community (CAP)- or hospital acquired (HAP), and, second pneumonia developing in critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients (VAP or ventilator- associated pneumonia).

Keywords

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pulmonary Infection Respir Crit Selective Digestive Decontamination Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Luzzani
  • E. Polati
  • S. Bassanini

There are no affiliations available

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