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Neuroprotective Treatment in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: a Phase I/II Study with Riluzole

  • N. Kalkers
  • F. Barkhof
  • L. Bergers
  • R. Van Schijndel
  • C. Polman
Part of the Topics in Neuroscience book series (TOPNEURO)

Abstract

Most currently available treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS), in particular corticosteroids and interferon β, especially address the inflammatory component of the disease. Their main clinical impact is on relapses whereas an effect on permanent disability so far has been less well established. This might be explained by observations, especially from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, that the correlation of inflammation with disease progression and development of disability is poor [1].

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Expand Disability Status Scale Magnetic Resonance Image Parameter Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Kalkers
  • F. Barkhof
  • L. Bergers
  • R. Van Schijndel
  • C. Polman

There are no affiliations available

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