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Obstetric Anaesthesia and Maternal Morbidity and Mortality

  • I. F. Russell
Conference paper

Abstract

Obstetric Anaesthesia may result in both maternal mortality and morbidity but, while maternal death is a clear and unambiguous end point, morbidity is more difficult to define, ranging as it does, from minor temporary complaints (e.g. sore throat, local tissue bruising) to major permanent pathology (e.g. neuropathy, paralysis). This chapter will examine the factors underlying the changes in anaesthetic related maternal mortality and morbidity over the past 50 years.

Keywords

Caesarean Section Maternal Mortality Epidural Analgesia Maternal Death Regional Anaesthesia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. F. Russell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnaesthesiaHull Royal InfirmaryHullUK

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