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Dermatitis caused by fish

  • Gianni Angelini
  • Domenico Bonamonte

Abstract

There are more than 500 species of vertebrate fishes that are poisonous to man, while another 250 species have venomous organs or apparatus that can cause very painful, sometimes fatal wounds. Both poisonous (cryptotoxic) and venomous (fanerotoxic) (faneros = clear, evident) fish pose a serious economic and social problem, as the former are a handicap to full exploitation of marine resources, while the spines and venomous sting apparatus of the latter are a danger to bathers, fishermen and other people engaged in water activities. The problem is aggravated by the fact that even on the rare occasions when the biotoxin can be identified, there are no known remedies able to neutralize the poisoning symptoms.

Keywords

Coral Reef Electric Organ Haemolytic Action Skin Secretion Toxic Fish 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gianni Angelini
    • 1
  • Domenico Bonamonte
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Immunology and Infectious Diseases Unit of DermatologyUniversity of BariItaly
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine, Immunology and Infectious Diseases Unit of DermatologyUniversity of BariItaly

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