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Parasites Commonly Associated with Recognized Agents of AIDS-Related Chronic Diarrhea in Developing Countries

  • Daniele Dionisio

Abstract

Intestinal parasitic and protozoan infections are widely spread around the world. Approximately 3.5 billion people are infected, and 450 million are symptomatic for these parasitoses, the majority being children [1]. Mixed infections with various par- asites are frequent, and their harmful potential is enhanced by concurrent micronutrient deficiencies or insufficient food intake [1].

Keywords

Stool Sample Rectal Prolapse Schistosoma Mansoni Entamoeba Histolytica Infectious Disease Clinic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Italia 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniele Dionisio

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