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Role of the Implantable Loop Recorder in the Management of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

  • A. S. Montenero
  • A. Quayyum
  • P. Franciosa
  • D. Mangiameli
  • A. Antonelli
  • M. Dell’Orto
  • M. Vimercati
  • N. Bruno
  • F. Zumbo
Conference paper

Abstract

Target sites for successful arrhythmia ablation can be characterized as being either discrete anatomic elements critical to maintaining the arrhythmia, or electrophysiologic markers which bode well for the procedure. Accessory atrioventricular connections are examples of relatively well defined discrete anatomical targets as the accessory pathways potential appear to be relatively specific electrophysiologic markers.

At the present time, techniques being studied for ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) address neither known critical anatomic elements nor well-defined electrophysiologic markers, although they are conceptually based on the “multiple wavelets” or “focal origin” hypotheses [1, 2]. There are few data on AF ablation based on catheter-mediated linear lesions; those that exist show success rates ranging between 25% and 67% [3-6]. Moreover, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) is an arrhythmia with a high recurrence rate, and although patients usually enrolled in studies are very symptomatic, the success rate of any treatment cannot be defined only on the basis of symptoms because of the high rate of asymptomatic recurrences. Therefore, in this subset of patients with an unpredictable follow-up, the accuracy of recurrence detection becomes very important. The present study investigates whether the linear ablation approach still may have a role in treating PAF, and whether the loop recorder system would be a helpful aid in refining ablation targets in the future.

Keywords

Atrial Fibrilla Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Right Atrium Atrial Fibrilla Ablation Atrial Fibrilla Recurrence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. S. Montenero
    • 1
  • A. Quayyum
    • 1
  • P. Franciosa
    • 1
  • D. Mangiameli
    • 1
  • A. Antonelli
    • 1
  • M. Dell’Orto
    • 1
  • M. Vimercati
    • 2
  • N. Bruno
    • 1
  • F. Zumbo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardiology and Arrhythmia CenterPoliclinico MultiMedicaItaly
  2. 2.Medtronic ItalyMilanItaly

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