Advertisement

The Problem of Recreational Sport in Patients with Mild to Moderate Heart Failure

  • F. Furlanello
  • F. Terrasi
  • A. Bertoldi
  • R. Cappato
Conference paper

Abstract

Today some information exists on the beneficial effect of exercise training in patients with mild to moderate heart failure (HF). Consequently, the common belief that rest is the mainstay of treatment in these patients should no longer be accepted [1]. In particular, an improvement in HF patients’ quality of life was observed in a prospective study, with a significant correlation between physiological and psychological improvements [2]. It has also been reported in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that exercise training is associated with reduction of peripheral resistance and small but significant improvements in stroke volume and reduction in cardiomegaly [3]. Exercise training results in an increase in peak heart rate and partial reversal of chronotropic incompetence in patients with CHF [4].

Keywords

Exercise Training Chronic Heart Failure Sudden Death Sport Activity Cardiac Rehabilitation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Coats AI, Adamopoulos S, Meyer TE, Conway J, Sleight P (1990) Effects of physical training in chronic heart failure. Lancet 335:803–804CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wielenga RF, Huisveld IA, Bol E, Dunselman PH, Erdman RA, Baselier MR, Mosterd WL (1999) Safety and effects of physical training in chronic heart failure. Results of the Chronic Heart Failure and Graded Exercise study (CHANGE). Eur Heart J 20:851–853CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hambrecht R, Gielen S, Linke A, Fiehn E, Yu J, Walther C, Schoene N, Schuler G (2000) Effects of exercise training on left ventricular function and peripheral resistance in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomized trial. JAMA 283:3095–3101PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Keteyian SJ, Brawner CA, Schairer JR, Levine TB, Levine AB, Rogers FJ, Goldstein S (1999) Effects of exercise training on chronotropic incompetence in patients with heart failure. Am Heart J 138(2 Pt 1):233–240PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    McKelvie RS, Teo KK, Roberts R, McCartney N, Humen D, Montague T, Hendrican K, Yusuf S (2002) Effects of exercise training in patients with heart failure: the Exercise Rehabilitation Trial (EXERT). Am Heart J 144:1–4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Halle M, Huonker M, Schmidt-Truckssar A, Irmer M, Korsten-Reck U, Durr H, van de Loo G, Keul J, Berg A (1998) Sports in the heart rehabilitation group—experiences with ambulatory rehabilitation at home. Ther Umsch 55:235–239PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sturm B, Quittan M, Wiesinger GF, Stanek B, Frey B, Pacher R (1999) Moderate-intensity exercise training with elements of step aerobics patients with severe chronic heart failure. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 80:746–750PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Maron BJ, Araujo CGS, Thompson PD, Flechter GF, Bayes de Luna A, Fleg JL, Pelliccia A, Balady GJ, Furlanello F, Van Camp SP, Elosua R, Chaitman BR, Bazzarre TL (2001) AHA Science Advisory. Recommendations for Preparticipation screening and the assessment of cardiovascular disease in masters athletes. An advisory for healthcare professionals from the Working Groups of the World Heart Federation, the International Federation Sports Medicine, and the American Heart Association Committee on Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, and Prevention. Circulation 103:327–334PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hambrecht R, Wolf A, Gilien S et al (2000) Effect of exercise on coronary endothelial function in patients with coronary artery disease. N Engl J Med 342:454–460PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Roberts WC (1984) An agent with lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, positive inotropic, negative chronotropic, vasodilating, diuretic, anorexigenic, weight reducing, cathartic, hypoglycemic, tranquilizing, hypnotic and antidepressive qualities. Am J Cardiol 53:261–262PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Stampfli U, Wagner D, Dubach P (1999) Cardiovascular diseases and sports. Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax 88:601–608Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Albert CM, Mittleman MA, Chae CU et al (2000) Triggering of sudden death from cardiac causes by vigorous exertion. N Engl J Med 343:1355–1361PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Maron BJ (2000) The paradox of exercise. N Engl J Med 343:1409–1411PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Furlanello F, Bertoldi A, Fernando F, Biffi A (2000) Competitive athletes with arrhythmias. Classification, evaluation and treatment. In: Bayes de Luna A, Furlanello F, Maron BJ, Zipes DP (eds) Arrhythmias and sudden death in athletes. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp 89–105Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Mittleman MA, MaclureM, Tofler GH et al (1993) Triggering of acute myocardial infarction by heavy physical exertion: protection against triggering by regular exertion: Determinants of Myocardial Infarction Onset Study Investigators. N Engl J Med 329:1677–1683PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Willich SN, Lewis M, Lowel H et al (1993) Physical exertion as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction: Triggers and Mechanisms of Myocardial Infarction Study Group. N Engl J Med 329:1684–1690PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Gibbons LW, Cooper KH Meyer BM et al (1980) The acute cardiac risk of strenous exercise. JAMA 244:1799–1801PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Ilkka V (1986) The cardiovascular risks of physical activity. Acta Med Scand 711:205–214Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Al Sheikh T, Zipes D (2000) Guidelines for competitive athletes with arrhythmias. In: Bayes de Luna A, Furlanello F, Maron BJ, Zipes DP (eds) Arrhythmias and sudden death in athletes. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp 119–151Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Comitato Organizzativo Cardiologico per l’Idoneità allo Sport (COCIS) (1996) Protocolli cardiologici per it giudizio di idoneità allo sport agonistico 1995. G Ital Cardiol 26:949–983Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Biffi A, Furlanello F, Caselli G, Bertoldi A, Fernando F (2000) Italian guidelines for competitive athletes with arrhythmias. In: Bayes de Luna A, Furlanello F, Maron BJ, Zipes DP (eds) Arrhythmias and sudden death in athletes. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp 153–601Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Maron BJ, Mitchell J (1994) Recommendations for determining eligibility for competition in athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities. J Am Coll Cardiol 24:848–899PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Corrado D, Basso C, Thiene G (2001) Sudden cardiac death in young people with apparently normal heart. Cardiovasc Res 50:399–408PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Thiene G, Basso C, Corrado D (2000) Pathology of sudden death in young athletes: European experience. In: Bayes de Luna A, Furlanello F, Maron BJ, Zipes DP (eds) Arrhythmias and sudden death in athletes. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp 49–69Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Fletcher GF (1997) How to implement physical activity in primary and secondary prevention: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association. Circulation 96:355–357PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Siscovick DS, Weiss NS, Fletcher RH et al (1984) The incidence of primary cardiac arrest during vigorous exercise. N Engl J Med 311:874–877PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Furlanello F, Fernando F, Galassi A, Bertoldi A (2001) Ventricular arrhythmias in apparently healthy athletes. In: Malik M (ed) Risk of arrhythmia and sudden death. BMJ Books, London, pp 316–324Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Furlanello F, Bertoldi A, Galassi A, Dallago M, Fernando F, Biffi A, Inama G, Loricchio ML, Pappone C (1999) Management of severe cardiac arrhythmic events in elite athletes. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 22:A165CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Furlanello F, Bertoldi A, Dallago M, Galassi A, Fernando F, Biffi A, Mazzone P, Pappone C, Chierchia S (1998) Atrial fibrillation in elite athletes. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 98 [Suppl]:563–568Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Bertoldi A, Furlanello F, Fernando F, Terrasi F, Furlanello C, Dallago M, Inama G, Galassi A, Cappato R (2002) Risk stratification in elite athletes with arrhythmias. In: Furlanello F, Bertoldi A, Cappato R (eds) Proceedings of The New Frontiers of Arrhythmias 2002. GIAC 5 [Suppl1]:218–219Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Dal Monte A (2000) The Italian classification of different sports in relation to cardiovascular risk. In: Bayes de Luna A, Furlanello F, Maron BJ, Zipes DP (eds) Arrhythmias and sudden death in athletes. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp 11–24Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Mitchell JH, Haskell WL, Raven PB (2000) Classification of sports. In: Bayes de Luna A, Furlanello F, Maron BJ, Zipes DP (eds) Arrhythmias and sudden death in athletes. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp 25–30Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Gronda E (2002) Clinical tool for the management of heart failure patients: the Serendipity Projects. In: Furlanello F, Bertoldi A, Cappato R (eds) Proceedings The New Frontiers of Arrhythmias 2002. GIAC 5[Suppl 1]:4–5Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Gensini GF, Eccher C, Forti S, Graiff A, Sboner A (2002) A guideline-based shared care through a computer-based cooperative system for the management of heart failure. In: Furlanello F, Bertoldi A, Cappato R (eds) Proceedings The New Frontiers of Arrhythmias 2002. GIAC 5[Suppl 1]:5–7Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Furlanello
    • 1
  • F. Terrasi
    • 2
  • A. Bertoldi
    • 3
  • R. Cappato
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Arrhythmias and ElectrophysiologyPoliclinico San DonatoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Villa Bianca HospitalTrentoItaly
  3. 3.Department of CardiologyS. Chiara HospitalTrentoItaly

Personalised recommendations