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Shoulder Instability: Glenoid and Humeral-Head Bone Defect

  • Paolo Baudi
  • Paolo Righi
  • Eugenio Rossi Urtoler
  • Giuseppe Milano

Abstract

Glenohumeral bone loss is one of the most important factors responsible for failure and recurrence after a shoulder arthroscopic instability repair. A high percentage of patients with traumatic, recurrent anterior instability have some level of glenohumeral bone loss. It is necessary to recognize the amount of bone loss preoperatively in order to determine successful management strategies. Standard radiographs may be inadequate for detecting the extent of glenoid and humeral-head bone loss.

Keywords

Bone Defect Shoulder Instability Glenoid Bone Loss Anterior Shoulder Dislocation Anterior Shoulder Instability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Baudi
  • Paolo Righi
  • Eugenio Rossi Urtoler
  • Giuseppe Milano

There are no affiliations available

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