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Darwinism Past and Present: Is It Past Its “Sell-by” Date?

  • Michael Ruse
Chapter

Abstract

The year 2009 was the 200th anniversary of the birth of the English naturalist Charles Darwin, and also the 150th anniversary of his great book, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. No one who takes science seriously would begrudge Darwin his fame, but there is a major question that is worth asking. Do we honor Darwin as an important figure in the history of science, but not necessarily as one whose thinking still speaks to us today? Or are there aspects of Darwinian thinking that are still important today? Is it possible, desirable indeed, to be a Darwinian in the sense found in the Origin?

Keywords

Natural Selection Continental Drift Fungus Gardening Hopeful Monster Beagle Voyage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l.  2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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