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Clinical Presentation

  • Anna Kohn
  • Caterina Maria Camastra
  • Rita Monterubbianesi
  • Marina Rizzi
Part of the Updates in Surgery book series (UPDATESSURG)

Abstract

Crohn’s disease (CD) involves the entire alimentary tract, starting from the mouth, and is characterized by focal exacerbations, with intermittent activity throughout the patient’s life. The initial manifestations are often insidious and vague. Systemic symptoms include unexplained fever, weight loss, and extraintestinal symptoms such as arthralgias and perianal abscess. The retrospective description of this initial disease course may be difficult and ill-defined, especially in the presence of intestinal symptoms that are rather nonspecific. Delays by the patient in seeking medical help and by the physician to identify the disease contribute to the long interval from onset to diagnosis, which tends to become even longer in patients with mild symptoms. More recently, however, owing to an improved awareness of the disease, this time interval has decreased.

Keywords

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pyoderma Gangrenosum Perianal Fistula Perianal Disease Extraintestinal Manifestation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Kohn
    • 1
  • Caterina Maria Camastra
    • 1
  • Rita Monterubbianesi
    • 1
  • Marina Rizzi
    • 2
  1. 1.Gastroenterology UnitSan Camillo-Forlanini HospitalRomeItaly
  2. 2.Gastroenterology UnitUniversity Campus Bio MedicoRomeItaly

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