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Neonatology pp 150-156 | Cite as

Organization of Perinatal Care

  • Neil Marlow

Abstract

Medical and nursing care for the newborn is organized differently in different health systems. Whereas general support in terms of screening and routine care is provided for a large number of babies in a maternity setting, neonatal intensive care for sick and immature babies is a low throughput high cost service. The development of neonatal intensive care has undoubtedly been one of the success stories of modern medicine. Its rapid evolution since the early 1970s has led to dramatic changes in mortality at low gestational ages and a reduction in immediate and later morbidities. Nonetheless, babies born at “borderline viability” (gestations with >50% mortality) have consistently demonstrated a very high morbidity rate, even though the “borderline” gestational age is reduced and currently sits at around 23–25 weeks in most developed countries.

Keywords

Neonatal Care Neonatal Unit Clinical Governance Total Unit Cost Neonatal Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neil Marlow
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Women’s HealthUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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