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Neonatology pp 1246-1265 | Cite as

Retinopathy of Prematurity

  • José Carlos Rivera
  • Elsa Duchemin-Kermorvant
  • Allison Dorfman
  • Luis M. Ospina
  • Sylvain Chemtob

Abstract

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is an ocular disease that occurs in premature infants and affects the blood vessels of the developing retina. It is characterized by the onset of visible vascular abnormalities in the second or third month after birth. The pathogenesis of ROP is related to many causative factors, like low birth weight, low gestational age, supplemental oxygen therapy, and some lines of evidence suggest the role of a genetic component. ROP is mild and undergoes spontaneous regression with no visual sequels in the majority of affected infants. However, progression to advanced ROP does occur in a significant number of infants and can lead to severe visual impairment and even complete unilateral or bilateral blindness in some cases. In general, more than 50% of premature infants weighing less than 1250 g at birth show evidence of ROP, and in approximately 3% of children it undergoes abnormal retinal vascular development, neovascularization, and, in its more severe forms, traction retinal detachment [1]. These injuries may occur despite the aggressive interventions currently available, such as cryotherapy or laser photocoagulation for this sightthreatening disease.

Keywords

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Premature Infant Retinal Detachment Scleral Buckling Retrolental Fibroplasia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Carlos Rivera
  • Elsa Duchemin-Kermorvant
  • Allison Dorfman
  • Luis M. Ospina
  • Sylvain Chemtob
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics, Ophthalmology and PharmacologyCentre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Research CenterMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Research CenterMontréalCanada

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