Advertisement

Neonatology pp 893-897 | Cite as

Fetal Infections: Congenital Syphilis, and Tuberculosis

  • Pier-Angelo Tovo
  • Carlo Scolfaro
  • Federica Mignone
  • Silvia Garazzino

Abstract

Significant progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis since the identification of the causative agent, Treponema pallidum, in 1905. However, syphilis remains a major public health problem in many developing countries and there has been a recrudescence in developed countries during the last two decades [1].

Keywords

Optic Neuritis Congenital Syphilis Secondary Syphilis Latent Syphilis Interstitial Keratitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2008) Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2007 Supplement, Syphilis Surveillance Report. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta. http://www.cdc.gov/std/Syphilis2007/ Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Walker GJ, Walker DG (2007) Congenital syphilis: a continuing but neglected problem. Semin Fetal Neonatal Med 12: 198–206PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Doroshenko A, Sherrard J, Pollard AJ (2006) Syphilis in pregnancy and the neonatal period. Int J STD AIDS 17: 221–227PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    World Health Organization (2001) Global prevalence and incidence of curable STIs. World Health Organization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ingall D, Sanchez PJ, Baker CJ (2006) Syphilis. In: Remington JS, Klein JO, Wilson CB, Baker CJ (eds) Infectious diseases of the fetus and newborn infant, 6th edn. Elsevier Saunders, Philadelphia, pp 545 - 580CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lautenschlager S (2006) Diagnosis of syphilis: clinical and laboratory problems. JDDG 12: 1058–1072CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2006) Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines. MMWR 55: 22–35Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    World Health Organization (2003) Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections. World Health Organization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kingston M, French P, Goh B et al (2008) UK National guidelines on the management of syphilis 2008. Int J STD AIDS 19: 729–740PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    World Health Organization (2010) Global tuberculosis control: epidemiology, strategy, financing: WHO report 2010. World Health Organization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Starke J (2006) Tuberculosis. In: Remington JS, Klein JO, Wilson CB, Baker CJ (eds) Infectious diseases of the fetus and newborn infant. Elsevier Saunders, Philadelphia, pp 581–597CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Smith KC (2002) Congenital tuberculosis: a rare manifestation of a common infection. Curr Opin Infect Dis 15: 269–274PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Whittaker E, Kampmann B (2008) Perinatal tuberculosis. New challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in infants and the newborn. Early Hum Dev 84: 795–799Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Patel S, DeSantis ER (2008) Treatment of congenital tuberculosis. Am J Health Syst Pharm 65: 2027–2031PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pier-Angelo Tovo
    • 1
  • Carlo Scolfaro
  • Federica Mignone
  • Silvia Garazzino
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of TurinTurinItaly

Personalised recommendations