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Neonatology pp 848-852 | Cite as

Congenital Immunodeficiencies

  • Alessandro Plebani
  • Gaetano Chirico

Abstract

The primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with defects in one or more components of the immune system. PIDs are classified into T lymphocyte, B lymphocyte, phagocytic cell, and complement deficiencies. This classification is simple and practical because clinical symptoms, mainly susceptibility to infections, vary according to the affected arm of the immune system. The prognosis of these disorders and their treatment depends on their early recognition and initiation of appropriate management.

Keywords

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Ataxia Telangiectasia Common Variable Immunodeficiency Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alessandro Plebani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gaetano Chirico
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsSpedali Civili HospitalItaly
  2. 2.University of BresciaBresciaItaly

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