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Prostate Biopsy

  • Sergio Cosciani Cunico
  • Alessandra Moroni
  • Giuseppe Mirabella
  • Claudio Simeone

Abstract

The clinical suspicion of prostate cancer requires histologic confirmation. In addition to the diagnosis, the biopsy correlated with other clinical parameters should also provide information on the local extent of disease to improve the clinical approach and facilitate the choice of the most appropriate treatment.

Keywords

Prostate Biopsy Digital Rectal Examination Prostate Cancer Detection Sextant Biopsy Prostate Cancer Detection Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sergio Cosciani Cunico
    • 1
  • Alessandra Moroni
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Mirabella
    • 1
  • Claudio Simeone
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of Brescia A. O. Spedali CiviliBresciaItaly

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