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Mathknow pp 1-8 | Cite as

The misuse of mathematics

  • Ralph Abraham
Part of the MS&A book series (MS&A, volume 3)

Abstract

The computer revolution has begotten new branches of mathematics: e.g., chaos theory and fractal geometry and their offspring, agent based modeling and complex dynamical systems. These new methods have extended and changed our understanding of the complex systems in which we live. But math models and computer simulations are frequently misunder-stood, or intentionally misrepresented, with disastrous results. In this essay, we recall the concept of structural stability from dynamical systems theory, and its role in the interpretation of modeling.

Keywords

Dynamical System Theory Chaos Theory Structural Instability Complex Dynamical System Shoreline Erosion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph Abraham
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA

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