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Treatment of Closed Fractures in Hemophiliac Patients

  • Ömer Taşer

Abstract

A fracture is defined as a disruption in the integrity of a bone. Most bones have the capacity to heal. However, healing of the fracture should not be perceived as only the union of the fractured bone, because when a trauma has the strength to break a bone, it inevitably damages adjacent tissues and joints. In most cases, even though the fracture may heal, the patient cannot go back to pre-fracture functional status if the adjacent tissues do not recover completely.

Keywords

External Fixator Compartment Syndrome Tranexamic Acid Fracture Treatment Hemophiliac Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ömer Taşer
    • 1
  1. 1.Orthopedic SurgeryMedical Faculty of Istanbul TopkapiIstanbulTurkey

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