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Techniques and Drugs in Paediatrics: TIVA and TCI

  • M. Astuto
  • N. Disma
  • E. Sanalitro
Conference paper

Abstract

After the discovery of barbiturates in the 1930s, the intravenous induction of anaesthesia became common and maintenance has become practical in the past decade. In 1977 propofol was introduced into clinical practice, and became the only available intravenous hypnotic agent suitable for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Recent advances in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anaesthetic drugs in infants and children, both with technological developments, have increased the routine use of total intravenous anaesthesia in paediatric patients. Intravenous hypnotic agents, short acting opioids and the new muscle relaxant drugs, together with new and sophisticated infusion pumps, have made total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) suitable for a large variety of paediatric surgical procedures, from day cases to cardiac surgery. The final challenge for paediatric anaesthetists will be achieving a profound understanding of the real incidence of awareness, particularly during TIVA, in which the only feedback is the predicted plasma concentration in the case of target controlled infusion (TCI) use [1].

Keywords

Total Intravenous Anaesthesia Target Control Infusion Predict Plasma Concentration Muscle Relaxant Drug Central Compartment Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Astuto
    • 1
  • N. Disma
    • 1
  • E. Sanalitro
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care“Policlinico” University HospitalCataniaItaly

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