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Non-invasive Ventilation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure and COPD or ARDS

  • G. Hilbert
  • F. Vargas
  • D. Gruson

Abstract

A major driving force behind the increasing use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been the desire to avoid the complications of invasive ventilation. Although invasive mechanical ventilation is highly effective and reliable in supporting alveolar ventilation, endotracheal intubation is associated with numerous risks of complications. These include upper-airway injuries, tracheal stenosis, tracheomalacia, sinusitis, and ventilator-associated pneumonia [1]. Torres et al. considered the correlation between several risk factors and the development of nosocomial pneumonia: the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and invasive ventilation for more than 3 days were significantly associated with an increased risk [2]. This complication of invasive ventilation is associated with a longer stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), increased costs and a worse outcome [2]. Furthermore, weaning difficulties are frequent in COPD patients [3], and the management of difficult-to-wean patients is a major clinical challenge that constitutes a large portion of the workload in an ICU [4].

Keywords

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Acute Exacerbation Acute Respiratory Failure Respir Crit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Hilbert
    • 1
  • F. Vargas
    • 1
  • D. Gruson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Intensive CareUniversity Hospital of BordeauxBordeauxFrance

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