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Ultrasound and Fetal Stress: Study of the Fetal Blink-Startle Reflex Evoked by Acoustic Stimuli

  • C. Bocchi
  • F. M. Severi
  • L. Bruni
  • G. Filardi
  • A. Delia
  • C. Boni
  • A. Altomare
  • C. V. Bellieni
  • F. Petraglia

Abstract

The development of ultrasound techniques opened a window on the prenatal world. Since the early 1990s, bidimensional ultrasonography has played an important role in the study of certain fetal behaviours in attempts to understand fetal well-being. Certain fetal attitudes can be likened to those subsequently seen in newborns [1]. Study of fetal circulation by Doppler ultrasonography in parts of the fetal body such as the middle cerebral arteries has also clearly shown that certain pathophysiological and pathological conditions cause a redistribution of normal fetal circulation, indicating a change in fetal status.

Keywords

Fetal Heart Rate Fetal Status Acta Obstet Gynecol Fetal Body Fetal Attitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Bocchi
    • 1
  • F. M. Severi
    • 1
  • L. Bruni
    • 1
  • G. Filardi
    • 1
  • A. Delia
    • 1
  • C. Boni
    • 1
  • A. Altomare
    • 1
  • C. V. Bellieni
    • 2
  • F. Petraglia
    • 3
  1. 1.Section of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproductive MedicineUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproduction MedicineUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  3. 3.Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproductive MedicineUniversity of SienaSienaItaly

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