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Rectopexy with Mesh According to the Ripstein Technique

  • Vance Sohn
  • Scott R. Steele
  • Anders Mellgren

Abstract

Full-thickness external rectal prolapse is a distressing condition for both the patient and surgeon. In addition to its unsightly and at times alarming appearance, rectal prolapse may cause progressive symptoms that affect both patients’ overall medical health as well as quality of life. This is distinct from internal rectal prolapse (also known as hidden or occult intussusception) in which the prolapse contains the full thickness of the rectal wall but the intussusception does not extend beyond the anal verge. Symptoms in the latter patients range from an asymptomatic finding in up to 40% of women on defecography to overt defecation dysfunction with obstructive symptoms. In contrast, full external prolapse occurs when the rectum descends beyond the anal verge, manifesting as concentric rings of rectal mucosa to the examiner. Varying degrees exist, as the prolapse may progress from initial reduction with standing or cessation of straining, to full-thickness prolapse with even minimal activity, and finally, in certain cases, to continual prolapse.

Keywords

Pelvic Floor Rectal Prolapse Sacral Promontory Rectal Intussusception Complete Rectal Prolapse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vance Sohn
    • 1
  • Scott R. Steele
    • 1
  • Anders Mellgren
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryMadigan Army Medical CenterTacomaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Colon and Rectal SurgeryUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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