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Double Incontinence

  • Mauro Cervigni
  • Albert Mako
  • Franca Natale
  • Marco Soligo

Abstract

Double incontinence (DI) is the concomitant presence of urinary and anal incontinence in the same subject. This condition is widely underreported due to social stigma and embarrassment. In fact, women who suffer from both diseases have greater impairment regarding their physical and psychosocial wellbeing than do women suffering from isolated urinary incontinence (UI) or fecal incontinence (FI) [1], resulting in social isolation and reduced quality of life [2]. Few studies have evaluated the prevalence of DI. The different results of these studies depend on the method utilized for data collection and on the demographic features of the study population. Table 1 shows the prevalence of DI reported by various authors [3-9].

Keywords

Urinary Incontinence Pelvic Floor Stress Urinary Incontinence Pelvic Organ Prolapse Obstet Gynecol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Cervigni
  • Albert Mako
  • Franca Natale
  • Marco Soligo

There are no affiliations available

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