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Rectal Prolapse

  • Michael E. D. Jarrett

Abstract

The term rectal prolapse can be associated with three different clinical entities: full-thickness rectal prolapse, mucosal prolapse and internal rectal intussusception. Full-thickness rectal prolapse is the most commonly recognised type and is defined as protrusion of the full thickness of the rectal wall through the anus. In mucosal prolapse, only the rectal mucosa protrudes from the anus. Internal intussusception may be a full thickness or a partial rectal-wall disorder, but the prolapsed tissue does not pass beyond the anal canal and does not pass out of the anus. This chapter focuses on full-thickness rectal prolapse with specific regard to associated faecal incontinence.

Keywords

Pelvic Floor Faecal Incontinence Anal Sphincter Rectal Prolapse Internal Anal Sphincter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. D. Jarrett

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