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Injectable Bulking Agents

  • Carolynne J. Vaizey
  • Yasuko Maeda
  • Joe J. Tjandra

Abstract

Faecal incontinence is a common but complex problem that can be difficult to treat successfully. Whereas some patients are helped by antidiarrhoeal drugs such as loperamide or codeine phosphate, this is a holding measure rather than a cure. Surgical treatments are limited, and some are complex with a high morbidity rate. The search for minimally invasive therapies continues. Sacral nerve stimulation is becoming the preferred option in many cases of internal and external anal sphincter dysfunction, but it is expensive and involves a two-stage procedure.

Keywords

Stress Urinary Incontinence Fecal Incontinence Internal Anal Sphincter Sacral Nerve Stimulation Endoanal Ultrasound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolynne J. Vaizey
  • Yasuko Maeda
  • Joe J. Tjandra

There are no affiliations available

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