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Dynamic Graciloplasty

  • Cornelius G. M. I. Baeten
  • Jarno Melenhorst
  • Harald R. Rosen

Abstract

Fecal incontinence is a terrible burden for patients. In severe forms of incontinence, patients feel excluded from any social interaction. They prefer to stay at home close to the toilet and try to avoid shopping, attending parties, or visiting friends. If they do go into public places, they know the location of every public toilet. Even in their own homes, most of them have rules with partner and children that the moment the patient feels any urge, the toilet must be free immediately. People who are not familiar with this phenomenon can hardly understand how terrible this can be for patients. Fecal continence is so normal and taken for granted that those who have never experienced it cannot imagine how life would be if the moment arrived when he or she became incontinent. The world shrinks to a size no bigger than the patient’s home. These patients have the choice of either accepting such a life or accepting a colostomy.

Keywords

Fecal Incontinence Anal Sphincter Pudendal Nerve Anal Incontinence Sphincter Defect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelius G. M. I. Baeten
  • Jarno Melenhorst
  • Harald R. Rosen

There are no affiliations available

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