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Imaging of Faecal Incontinence with Endoanal Ultrasound

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Abstract

Endoanal ultrasound (EUS) was introduced 20 years ago by urologists to evaluate the prostate. Later, EUS was extended to other specialists-; first to stage rectal tumors, and next to investigate benign disorders of the anal sphincters and pelvic floor.

Keywords

  • Faecal Incontinence
  • Anal Sphincter
  • External Anal Sphincter
  • Internal Anal Sphincter
  • Anal Incontinence

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Felt-Bersma, R.J.F. (2007). Imaging of Faecal Incontinence with Endoanal Ultrasound. In: Ratto, C., Doglietto, G.B., Lowry, A.C., Påhlman, L., Romano, G. (eds) Fecal Incontinence. Springer, Milano. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-88-470-0638-6_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-88-470-0638-6_10

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