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Hypertensive Urgencies and Emergencies

  • J. L. Atlee
Part of the Topics in Anaesthesia and Critical Care book series (TIACC)

Abstract

As persons age, their life styles change, and they become more affluent and obese. If this trend continues, the incidence of associated hypertension (HTN) will continue to increase worldwide [1]. At the same time, despite widely recognized dangers of uncontrolled HTN, it is still under-treated in most patients. Such inadequate HTN control is seen not only in closely followed populations, but also in closely monitored anti-HTN drug trials [1]. Moreover, cardiovascular risk remains high in the majority of people with HTN, whether they are treated or not.

Keywords

Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Blood Pressure Reading Joint National Committee Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial Dihydropyridine Calcium Channel Blocker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Atlee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyMedical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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