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Treatment of AIDS Anorexia-Cachexia Syndrome and Lipodystrophy

  • Daniele Scevola
  • Omar Giglio
  • Silvia Scevola

Abstract

Anorexia-cachexia syndrome [1] and lipodystrophy [2] [6] are two conditions frequently associated with the course of HIV infection. Under many circumstances, they can be included as components of a single disease, multifactorial in origin, leading to alterations of energetic metabolism and to body fat tissue modifications. The risk for the clinician is of only partially considering the two diseases, for which, until recently, a true definition [3] was lacking. The approach to therapy, due to the multifactorial origin, must be multidisciplinary, involving experts in nutrition, infectious diseases, physiology, gastroenterology, etc.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Rest Metabolic Rate Total Body Water Megestrol Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniele Scevola
    • 1
  • Omar Giglio
    • 1
  • Silvia Scevola
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS S.Matteo PolyclinicUniversity of PaviaPaviaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, IRCCS Maugeri FoundationUniversity of PaviaPaviaItaly

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