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IFAE 2006 pp 233-236 | Cite as

Neutral Kaon Physics at KLOE

  • Marco Dreucci
Conference paper

Abstract

KLOE data taking at DAΦNE (the Frascati e + e collider) has been terminated on March 2006, after collecting more than 2 fm−1. The results presented in this article are based on the 450 pb−1 of data taken in 2001 and 2002. The KLOE detector consists of a large cylindrical drift chamber (DC), surrounded by a lead scintillating-fiber electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) with 4880 PMT’s. A superconducting coil around the calorimeter provides a 0.52T field. The drift chamber [1] is 4m in diameter and 3.3m long, filled with a 90%He+10%IsoB gas. The momentum resolution is σ p/p⊥ 0.4%. The vertex resolution is ∼ 2mm. The calorimeter [2] is divided into a barrel and two endcaps. It covers 98% of the solid angle. Cells close in time and space are grouped into calorimeter clusters. The energy and time resolutions are rispectively \( \sigma _E /E = 5.7\% /\sqrt {E(GeV)} and \sigma _T = 54ps/\sqrt {E(GeV)} \oplus 100 ps \) . The two-level KLOE trigger [3] uses calorimeter and chamber informations. Recognition and rejection of cosmic-ray events is also performed at the trigger level. The KLOE Monte Carlo (MC) program, GEANFI [4], includes a full description of the KLOE detector. Machine background is extracted for each run and overlaid with the event generator. Radiative contributions are implemented in the kaon decay generators [5]. An example of Data-Monte Carlo agreement is shown in Fig. 1, for the main K L charged decays.

Keywords

Monte Carlo Drift Chamber Neutral Kaon Charged Decay Vertex Resolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Dreucci
    • 1
  1. 1.INFN dei Laboratori Nazionali di FrascatiItaly

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