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Spontaneous Animal Models

  • Philip R. Fox
  • Cristina Basso
  • Gaetano Thiene
  • Barry J. Maron

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease occurs commonly in companion animals, particularly in domestic cats and dogs [1]. Myocardial disease represents a substantial portion of these disorders, many of which closely resemble cardiomyopathies in human patients [2]. Such disorders in cat, include hypertrophic [3, 4], dilated [5], restrictive [6, 7], and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies (ARVC/D) [8]. A heritable form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with a cardiac myosin binding protein C mutation has been recently reported in the Maine Coon cat breed [4]. In dogs, chronic myxomatous valve disease is the most prevalent cardiac disorder [9, 10], but cardiomyopathies occur frequently, particularly within certain medium and large-sized breeds [10]. Familial forms of dilated cardiomyopathy have been described in the Doberman Pinscher [11], Irish wolfhound [12], and Great Dane [13], and a familial form of ARVC/D has been reported in the boxer breed [14, 15]. Dysplastic conditions of the right ventricle (RV) have been described in other mammals including minks [16] and rodents. In mice, ARVC/D has been associated with mutation of the gene laminin receptor [17]. One of the authors (PF) has observed a case of ARVC/D in a primate.

Keywords

Right Ventricle Left Bundle Branch Block Ventricular Cardiomyopathy Right Ventricle Free Wall Right Ventricle Wall 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip R. Fox
    • 1
  • Cristina Basso
    • 2
  • Gaetano Thiene
    • 2
  • Barry J. Maron
    • 3
  1. 1.Caspary InstituteThe Animal Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical Diagnostic SciencesUniversity of PaduaItaly
  3. 3.Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy CenterMinneapolis Heart Institute FoundationMinneapolisUSA

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