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Agrotechnology, Production, and Demonstration of High-Quality Planting Material for Biofuels in Arid and Semiarid Regions

  • Ashwani Kumar
  • Shikha Roy
Chapter

Abstract

Several plant families widely growing in Rajasthan have great potential as renewable source of energy. Euphorbiaceae (Euphorbia antisyphilitica, E. tithymaloides, E. caducifolia, E. lathyris, E. neriifolia, Jatropha curcas, etc.), Asclepiadaceae (Calotropis gigantea and C. procera), Asteraceae, and Apocynaceae have a large number of valuable plants. These plants are able to grow well in arid and semiarid conditions of Rajasthan. We developed agrotechnology for some of these plants and suggested a three-tier system for optimum production of biomass. Influence of growth regulators, edaphic factors, cropping pattern, and nutritional factors have been optimized. The biofuel yield could be increased by employing technologies developed at University of Rajasthan, Jaipur. Production of high-quality plant material of Jatropha curcas was carried out at 35 ha Energy Plantation Demonstration Project Center, University of Rajasthan, under the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India project sanctioned to authors. The selected plant materials were characterized for their hydrocarbon and oil contents. High-yielding accessions of Jatropha curcas have been deposited at the National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Delhi. Accession IC565601 and IC565602 have been planted at Viratnagar near Jaipur. Elite strains have given excellent performance depending on edaphic, climatic, and nutritional conditions. This paper will try to review mainly our own work carried during last 30 years giving citations.

Keywords

Biodiesel Bioenergy Biofuel Biological conversion Biomass 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Research grants for carrying out this work from the Department of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (DNES), Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, and Department of Biotechnology Govt. of India are gratefully acknowledged. The land area provided by University of Rajasthan and facilities provided by the Head Department of Botany are also acknowledged. We also acknowledge services of research fellows and field-workers who contributed to the research. The National Botanical Research Institute (Lucknow), the Indian Institute of Petroleum (Dehradun), and The Energy and Resources Institute (New Delhi) were also associated in all India coordinated programs with us, and their cooperation is acknowledged.

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© Springer (India) Pvt. Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Botany and P.G. School of BiotechnologyUniversity of RajasthanJaipurIndia

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