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Cephalopods

  • Sreepat Jain
Chapter
Part of the Springer Geology book series (SPRINGERGEOL)

Abstract

Cephalopods are bilaterally symmetrical swimming marine carnivore molluscs that include modern day cuttlefish, octopus, squid, pearly Nautilus, and a large number of and mostly Paleozoic and Mesozoic forms. At present there are 800 living cephalopod species (~175 genera) and more than 17,000 (~600 genera) fossil forms; these are the largest group after Arthropods.

Keywords

Internal Mold Body Chamber Main Morphological Feature Whorl Section Whorl Height 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New DelhiIndia

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