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Ethnic Fermented Foods of Nepal

  • Tika Karki
  • Pravin Ojha
  • Om Prakash Panta
Chapter

Summary

The topographical and ecological niche variations of Nepal have been blessed with diverse microbial community and variations in preparation methodology and use of substrates which have eventually resulted in a wide range of sensory attributes. Ethnic communities of Nepal have their own diverse culture and cultural heritage resulting into various types of fermented foods. Gundruk, mesu, sinki, and khalpi are the fermented vegetables produced by lactics from Brassica leafy vegetables, tender bamboo shoot, radish, and ripened cucumber, respectively, which are consumed as a soup, curry, and pickles and preferred by all indigenous groups of Nepal. Similarly kinema is a non-salted fermented soybean product by Bacillus sp. with an ammoniacal odor. However murcha is a traditional starter culture for producing alcoholic beverages from starchy substrates which consists of saccharifying molds, liquifying yeasts, and lactics. Jaanr, raksi, and hyaun thon are the resultant fermented alcoholic beverages of Nepal prepared by using murcha starter and cereal as base ingredients which are consumed only by a certain ethnic group. These indigenous fermented foods are highly acclaimed products and have been consumed since time immemorial. These are spontaneously fermented products by natural flora. Improvement and standardization of the traditional process may be considered as an essential element in the protection, conservation, and exploration of our indigenous resources for industrialization and sustainable development.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Lactic Acid Bacterium Rice Wine Fermented Soybean Bamboo Shoot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of BiotechnologyKathmandu UniversityKathmanduNepal
  2. 2.Food Research DivisionNepal Agricultural Research CouncilLalitpurNepal
  3. 3.Department of MicrobiologyNational CollegeKathmanduNepal

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