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Acute Throat Disorders

  • T. L. Vasudevan
  • Suresh S. David
Chapter

Abstract

Sore throat is a common complaint in the emergency department and is often associated with benign conditions, such as pharyngitis. The neck and throat are regions rich in vascular and lymphatic activity. They also house the food passage and airway; hence, any pathology – allergic, infective, neoplastic as well as foreign bodies – causes significant discomfort. A high index of suspicion should be maintained to diagnose less common but serious pathology, such as epiglottitis and retropharyngeal abscess. This chapter briefly highlights the salient emergencies concerning the throat.

Keywords

Surgical Drainage Laryngeal Oedema Retropharyngeal Abscess Streptococcus Viridans Bilateral Vocal Cord Palsy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ENT Surgical ClinicPondicherryIndia
  2. 2.Head, Department of Emergency MedicinePushpagiri Medical College HospitalTiruvallaIndia

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