Gynaecological Infections



Gynaecological infections may present to the emergency department with vague non-specific lower abdominal pain.


Bacterial Vaginosis Chlamydia Trachomatis Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Lower Abdominal Pain Gynaecological Infection 


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Copyright information

© Springer India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Emergency Medicine DepartmentKokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research InstituteMumbaiIndia

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