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Collection of Germplasm of Scented Rice Cultivars and Grain Morphological Assessment

  • Altafhusain Nadaf
  • Sarika Mathure
  • Narendra Jawali
Chapter

Abstract

Ancient India is one of the oldest regions where cultivation of O. sativa L. began. The foothill of the Himalayas is the center of diversity of scented rice of Group V; from here by westward route scented rice cultivars are distributed in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, and Gujarat (Glaszmann 1987). In these states, numerous scented varieties belonging to this group are grown under different names (Khush 2000, Table 2.1). It is estimated that India has over 70,000 cultivars of rice germplasm and has a sizable number of wild forms still to be collected and conserved (Siddiq 1992). Since the time of civilization, thousands of locally adapted scented rice genotypes have evolved as a consequence of natural and human selection. These landraces are the genetic reservoirs of useful genes. The collection and evaluation of landraces are a part of the fundamental work of rice geneticists for breeding purposes. Considering the need for broadening the gene pool of rice, it is necessary to collect and conserve the cultivars that are locally cultivated and maintained by farmers.

Keywords

Rice Cultivar Field Collection Rice Germplasm Niche Area Sterile Lemma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Altafhusain Nadaf
    • 1
  • Sarika Mathure
    • 1
  • Narendra Jawali
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BotanySavitribai Phule Pune UniversityPuneIndia
  2. 2.Molecular Biology DivisionBhabha Atomic Research CentreMumbaiIndia

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