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Introduction: A Long-Standing Relationship

  • Ajay Kumar Dubey
  • Aparajita Biswas
Chapter
Part of the India Studies in Business and Economics book series (ISBE)

Abstract

Contact between India and Africa dates back to ancient times, when Indian merchants were trading extensively with the Indian Ocean littorals in Africa. The period of European colonial expansion, which included the incorporation of the Indian subcontinent and large swathes of Africa into the British Empire, helped establish a large community of people of Indian origin in Africa, adding to a rich history of two-way traffic. This chapter provides an introduction to the contributed volume with details regarding each contribution.

Keywords

African Country World Trade Organization Doha Round Tariff Line Economic Diplomacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© African Studies Association of India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UGC Centre for African Studies, School of International StudiesJawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)New DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Centre for African Studies (CAS)University of MumbaiMumbaiIndia

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