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Botrytis Gray Mold of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

  • H. S. Tripathi
  • Usha Suyal

Abstract

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) commonly known as gram is a versatile crop among the grain legumes and ranks first among the pulses both in acreage and production. It is an important pulse crop in over 45 countries of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania, with an annual production of 8.62 million tonnes from 11.12 million hectares (FAO 2005). Chickpea is used as an important source of protein in human nutrition and cattle feed and is also used to improve soil fertility by biological nitrogen fixation. Chickpea usually receives few inputs other than labor, insecticides, and seed. The major constraints to production include disease susceptibility of local varieties, environmental stresses, drought, diseases, pests, and poor crop management. Worldwide losses from this fungus account for 20 % of the harvest of the affected crops, and their cost is estimated at 10–100 billion euros per year (Genoscope 2008). The fertile land and frequent rain during crop growth are responsible for dense canopy creating a microenvironment highly variable to growth and development of the pathogen. Several epidemics of BGM causing complete crop loss in the major chickpea-producing countries have been reported. Botrytis gray mold (BGM) caused by B. cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is the second most potentially important disease of chickpea after Ascochyta blight caused by Ascochyta rabiei [Pass] Lab. BGM can devastate chickpea, resulting in complete yield loss in years of extensive winter rains and high humidity (Reddy et al. 1993; Pandey et al. 1982).

Keywords

Foliar Spray Botrytis Cinerea Conidial Germination Gray Mold Ascochyta Blight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre of Advance Studies in Plant PathologyG.B. Pant University of Agriculture and TechnologyPantnagarIndia

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