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Abstract

Drosophila ananassae is a domestic species with cosmopolitan distribution, found in all six zoogeographic regions. It belongs to the ananassae subgroup, which is further divided into ananassae complex and bipectinata complex. Drosophila pallidosa is a sibling species of Drosophila ananassae with complete sexual isolation. Drosophila ananassae is genetically unique among Drosophila species due to certain genetic peculiarities notably spontaneous crossing-over in males, spontaneous bilateral genetic mosaic, segregation distortion (meiotic drive), Y-4 linkage of nucleolus organizer, parthenogenesis, extrachromosomal inheritance, and lack of genetic coadaptation. Natural populations of Drosophila ananassae exhibit a large number of inversions. A total of 76 paracentric inversions, 21 pericentric inversions, and 48 translocations are reported so far. Most of these paracentric inversions are transient in nature and have limited distribution, while the three inversions, namely, Alpha (AL) in 2L, Delta (DE) in 3L, and Eta (ET) in 3R, are cosmopolitan in nature and are distributed worldwide. In view of its unique position, several aspects of behavior genetics of Drosophila ananassae like phototactic behavior, latitudinal variation in eclosion rhythm in the locomotor activity, oviposition site preference, and pupation site preference, mating propensity, sexual activity, and chromosomal polymorphism were studied. Laboratory populations of Drosophila ananassae were also subjected to fluctuating asymmetry (FA) studies to analyze deviation from perfect symmetry of bilaterally symmetrical metrical traits.

Keywords

Fluctuate Asymmetry Pericentric Inversion Sexual Isolation Paracentric Inversion Inversion Polymorphism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pranveer Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyIndira Gandhi National Tribal UniversityAmarkantakIndia

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