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Nature as Elemental: The Matter of Nature

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Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 12)

Abstract

The idea of nature as constituted by five elements, or pa Open image in new window camahabhūtas, is very popular in many naturalistic philosophies. Such a universe consists of both living and non-living parts of the cosmos . These elements are imagined as intangible to begin with, and then, they are understood as combining to form the gross elements which make up the cosmos. Traditions such as Vaiśeṣika and Saṁkhya explain the nature of these five fundamental elements and the process of creation of manifold diversities within them. This chapter will describe the materialism within Indian traditions and also dwell on the Vaiśeṣika atomism and the evolutionary nature of Saṁkhya tradition.

Keywords

Elements paOpen image in new windowcamahabhūtas Matter Creation Earth Water Fire Air Ākaśa Atoms Transformation Subtle elements Gross elements 

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Manipal Centre for Philosophy and HumanitiesManipal University ManipalIndia

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