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Conceptualisations of Nature: The Narratives So Far

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Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter traces the history of the idea of nature in Western traditions of thought, giving the reader a background into the complexity of the idea. Earlier work by scholars is summarised with explanations and comments in order to indicate how the concept of nature has always been conceptualised through particular historical and cultural perspectives. The need to study the concept of nature within alternative traditions of thought is discussed. Building on the themes from the earlier chapter, a brief outline of some of the major disciplines linked to the field of Environmental Philosophy is also described.

Keywords

Conceptualisation of nature in Western traditions of thought Science and nature Bacon’s project Enlightenment Romanticism 

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Manipal Centre for Philosophy and HumanitiesManipal University ManipalIndia

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