Manganese (Mn) Uptake

  • Gyanendra Nath Mitra


Mn deficiency is rarely observed since its cellular requirement is low. Mn is a component of photosynthetic proteins and enzymes. Mn is a cofactor of about 35 enzymes. Mn2+ uptake by roots is biphasic and consists of (1) an initial rapid reversible and non-metabolic process and (2) a slow second phase. The gene families involved in Mn transport include cation/H+ antiporters, Nramps, the ZIP family and the CDF family.


Pyruvate Carboxylase Charge Cell Wall Necrotic Leaf Spot Sequential Electron Transfer White Lupine Plant 


  1. Abou M, Symeonidis L, Hatzistavrou E, Yupsanis T (2002) Nucleolytic activities and appearance of a new DNase in relation to nickel and manganese accumulation in Alyssum múrale. J Plant Physiol 159:1087–1095CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bradl H (2004) Adsorption of heavy metal ions on soils and soils constituents. J Colloid Interface Sci 277:1–18CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Burnell J (1988) The biochemistry of manganese in plants. In: Graham RD, Hannam RJ, Uren NJ (eds) Manganese in soil and plants. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp 125–137CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cailliatte R, Lapeyre B, Briat JF, Mari S, Curie C (2009) The NRAMP6 metal transporter contributes to cadmium toxicity. Biochem J 422:217–228CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Cailliatte R, Schikora A, Briat J-F, Mari S, Curie C (2010) High-affinity manganese uptake by the metal transporter NRAMP1 is essential for Arabidopsis growth in low manganese conditions. Plant Cell 22(3):904–917CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Curie C, Alonso JM, Le Jean M, Ecker JR, Briat JF (2000) Involvement of NRAMP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana in iron transport. Biochem J 347:749–755CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Demirevska-Kepova K, Simova-Stoilova L, Stoyanova Z, Holzer R, Feller U (2004) Biochemical changes in barley plants after excessive supply of copper and manganese. Environ Exp Bot 52:253–266CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ducic T, Polle A (2005) Transport and detoxification of manganese and copper in plants. Braz J Plant Physiol 17:103–112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Eide DJ (1998) The molecular biology of metal ion transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Annu Rev Nutr 18:441–469CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Eide D, Broderius M, Fett J, Guerinot ML (1996) A novel iron-regulated metal transporter from plants identified by functional expression in yeast. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 93:5624–5628CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Ferreira KN, Iverson TM, Maghlaoui K, Barber J, Iwata S (2004) Architecture of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving center. Science 303:1831–1838CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Führs H, Hartwig M, Buitrago L, Heintz D, Van Dorsselaer A, Braun H, Horst W (2008) Early manganese-toxicity response in Vigna unguiculata L. – a proteomic and transcriptomic study. Proteomics 8:149–159CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Guest C, Schulze D, Thompson I, Huber D (2002) Correlating manganese X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra with extractable soil manganese. Soil Sci Soc Am J 66:1172–1181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hall JL, Williams LE (2003) Transition metal transporters in plants. J Exp Bot 54(393):2601–2613CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Hanikenne M, Motte P, Wu MCS, Wang T, Loppes R, Matagne RF (2005) A mitochondrial half-size ABC transporter is involved in cadmium tolerance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Plant Cell Environ 28(7):863–873CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hirschi KD, Zhen R-G, Cunningham KW, Rea PA, Fink GR (1996) CAX1, an H+/Ca2+ antiporter from Arabidopsis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 93:8782–8786CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Hirschi KD, Korenkov VD, Wilganowski NL, Wagner GJ (2000) Expression of Arabidopsis CAX2 in tobacco, altered metal accumulation and increased manganese tolerance. Plant Physiol 124:125–134CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Houtz RL, Nable RO, Cheniae GM (1988) Evidence for effects on the in vivo activity of ribulose-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase during development of Mn toxicity in tobacco. Plant Physiol 86:1143–1149CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Humphries J, Stangoulis J, Graham R (2007) Manganese. In: Barker A, Pilbeam D (eds) Handbook of plant nutrition. Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, pp 351–366Google Scholar
  20. Ishimaru Y, Takahashi R, Bashir K et al (2012) Characterizing the role of rice NRAMP5 in manganese, iron and cadmium transport. Sci Rep 2:286CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Lidon FC, Barreiro M, Ramalho J (2004) Manganese accumulation in rice: implications for photosynthetic functioning. J Plant Physiol 161:1235–1244CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Lindsay WL (1979) Solubilities of common zinc minerals in soils, chemical equilibria in soils. John Wiley and Sons, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  23. Lindsay WL (1981) Chemistry in soil environment. ASA, MadisonGoogle Scholar
  24. Marshner H (1995) Mineral nutrition of higher plants. Academic, London, pp 313–323CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Merchant S (2005) The light reactions: a guide to recent acquisition for the picture gallery. Plant Cell 17(3):648–663CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Millaleo R, Reyes-Diaz M, Ivanov AG, Mora ML, Alberdi M (2010) Manganese as essential and toxic element for plants: transport, accumulation and resistance mechanisms. J Soil Sci Plant Nutr 10(4):470–481CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Milner MJ, Seamon J, Craft F, Kochian LV (2013) Transport properties of members of the ZIP family in plants and their role in Zn and Mn homeostasis. J Exp Bot 64(1):369–381CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Mora M, Rosas A, Ribera A, Rengel R (2009) Differential tolerance to Mn toxicity in perennial ryegrass genotypes: involvement of antioxidative enzymes and root exudation of carboxylates. Plant Soil 320:79–89CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Moroni J, Scott B, Wratten N (2003) Differential tolerance of high manganese among rapeseed genotypes. Plant Soil 253:507–519CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Neumann G, Romheld V (2001) The release of root exudates as affected by the plants physiological status. In: Pinto R, Varanini Z, Nannipieri P (eds) The rhizosphere: biochemistry and organic substances at the soil-plant interface. Marcel Dekker, New York, pp 41–93Google Scholar
  31. Page V, Feller U (2005) Selective transport of zinc, manganese, nickel, cobalt and cadmium in the root system and transfer to the leaves in young wheat plants. Ann Bot 96:425–434CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  32. Page V, Weisskopf L, Feller U (2006) Heavy metals in white lupin: uptake, root-to-shoot transfer and redistribution within the plant. New Phytol 171:329–341CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Paulsen IT, Saier MH Jr (1997) A novel family of ubiquitous heavy metal ion transport proteins. J Membr Biol 156:99–103CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Pedas P, Ytting CK, Fuglsang AT, Jahn TP, Schjoerring JK, Husted S (2008) Manganese efficiency in barley: identification and characterization of the metal ion transporter HvIRT1. Plant Physiol 148:455–466CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Pfeffer PE, Tu S, Gerasimowicz WV, Cavanaugh JR (1986) In vivo 3IP NMR studies of corn root tissue and its uptake of toxic metals. Plant Physiol 80:77–84CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  36. Rosas A, Rengel Z, Mora M (2007) Manganese supply and pH influence growth, carboxylate exudation and peroxidase activity of ryegrass and white clover. J Plant Nutr 30:253–270CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Ryan P, Delhaize E, Jones D (2001) Function and mechanism of organic anion exudation from plant roots. Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol 52:527–560CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Sahu SK, Mitra GN (1997) Acid soils of India. Publication and Information Division, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New DelhiGoogle Scholar
  39. Thomine S, Wang R, Ward JM, Crawford NM, Schroeder JI (2000) Cadmium and iron transport by members of a plant metal transporter family in Arabidopsis with homology to Nramp genes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:4991–4996CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Van der Zaal BJ, Neuteboom LW, Pinas JE, Chardonnens AN, Schat H, Verkleij JAC, Hooykaas PJJ (1999) Over-expression of a novel Arabidopsis gene related to putative zinc-transporter genes from animals can lead to enhanced zinc resistance and accumulation. Plant Physiol 119:1047–1055CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  41. Vert G, Grotz N, Dedaldechamp F, Gaymard F, Guerinot ML, Briat JF, Curie C (2002) IRT1, an Arabidopsis transporter essential for iron uptake from the soil and for plant growth. Plant Cell 14:1223–1233CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  42. Xiao H, Yin L, Xu X, Li T, Han Z (2008) The iron-regulated transporter, MbNRAMP1, isolated from Malus baccata is involved in Fe, Mn and Cd trafficking. Ann Bot 102:881–889CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Yang et al (2007) Manganese uptake and transportation as well as antioxidant response to excess manganese in plants. College of Plant Science, Agricultural Division, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, China 2007 Dec, 33(6):480–488 (Article in Chinese, English Abstract)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gyanendra Nath Mitra
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Soil Science and Agricultural ChemistryOrissa University of Agriculture and TechnologyBhubaneswarIndia

Personalised recommendations