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Godawari Green: Got-to-Worry?

The Time Cost Compact
  • Srinivasan Sunderasan
Chapter

Abstract

In 2010, Godawari Power and Ispat Limited, through wholly owned subsidiary Godawari Green Energy Limited (ggelindia.com) (“Godawari,” the Project Company), and six other firms were awarded contracts to install concentrating solar power (CSP) plants of the type shown in Fig. 8.1 and to sell electricity at an average price of INR 11,480 (~USD 200) per MWh. The seven projects added up to 470 MW in capacity and involved about USD 1 billion in investments, averaging about USD 2.2 million per MW in capital costs.

Keywords

Cash Flow Heat Transfer Fluid Solar Radiation Data Concentrate Solar Power Solar Power Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Verdurous Solutions Private LimitedMysoreIndia

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