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Venous Telangiectasia and Reticular Veins: Clinical Class C1

  • Subramoniam Vaidyanathan
Chapter

Abstract

According to the CEAP classification, reticular veins and telangiectasias come under the C1 clinical class. These lesions are usually associated with truncal and tributary varices. Occasionally, they can present as independent lesions. Till recently, most of the C1 clinical class of patients were overlooked. There is a renewed interest in this subset of patients mainly due to two reasons. A significant number have symptoms of throbbing and pain, out of proportion to the visible extent and size of the varices. More than 80 % of patients with C1 lesions are women and cosmetic improvement is a major concern. With cosmetic dermatology evolving as an independent service, these lesions have assumed greater significance. This chapter focuses on the venous telangiectasias and reticular veins of the lower limbs associated with chronic venous disorders (CVD).

Keywords

Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Intense Pulse Light Small Vein Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging Cosmetic Improvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.General SurgeryAmrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita LaneKochiIndia

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