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Tropical Fruit Crops

  • P. Parvatha Reddy
Chapter

Abstract

Symptoms, biomanagement and integrated management of fungal, bacterial and viral diseases, nematode pests, disease complexes and insect pests of tropical fruit crops (banana, citrus, papaya, mulberry and avocado) using PGPR alone or PGPR integrated with physical and cultural methods, botanicals, bioagents and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are discussed.

Keywords

Nematode Population Soil Application Fusaric Acid Plant Growth Parameter Cercospora Leaf Spot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Parvatha Reddy
    • 1
  1. 1.Indian Institute of Horticultural ResearchBangaloreIndia

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