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Technology Translation from Heat Physiology Research

  • Thiruthara Pappu Baburaj
  • Bharadwaj Abhishek
  • Amir Chand Bajaj
  • Gulab Singh
  • Pooja Chaudhary
  • Laxmi Prabha Singh
  • Medha Kapoor
  • Usha Panjawani
  • Shashi Bala Singh
Chapter

Abstract

A major effect of high-ambient-temperature exposure on human body is rise in body temperature and sweating, leading to dehydration with loss in electrolytes. Keeping these effects in focus, research was conducted to address the following issues: (a) body dehydration by developing a fluid replenishment drink and (b) auxiliary cooling system for the human body. The outcome of these studies is formulation of replenishment drink DIP-SIP and development of a man-mounted air conditioning system (MMACS).

Keywords

Heat Stress Vortex Tube Sweat Rate High Ambient Temperature Heat Stress Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thiruthara Pappu Baburaj
    • 1
  • Bharadwaj Abhishek
    • 1
  • Amir Chand Bajaj
    • 1
  • Gulab Singh
    • 1
  • Pooja Chaudhary
    • 1
  • Laxmi Prabha Singh
    • 1
  • Medha Kapoor
    • 1
  • Usha Panjawani
    • 1
  • Shashi Bala Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (DIPAS)DelhiIndia

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